State Councillor's House: a mansion of the 19th century in Dashkov Pereulok recognised as an architectural landmark

State Councillor's House: a mansion of the 19th century in Dashkov Pereulok recognised as an architectural landmark
The lane owes its name to Andrei Dashkov, Senator and State Councillor, one of the mansion's owners. Constructed in classicism style, this two-storey building is a piece of Moscow residential development design of the early 19th century.

The main building of the urban estate of the early 19th century in Dashkov Pereulok has been listed as a cultural heritage site of regional significance. This two-storey fenced stone mansion is a piece of classicism style. The lane that emerged on Moscow map in 1838 owes its name to Andrei Dashkov (1790–1865), Senator and Active State Councillor, one of the mansion's owners.

The estate was first mentioned in 1816, when it belonged to Major General Yakov Merlin. In addition to the main building, the complex comprised several wooden residential wings and outbuildings. They have not survived. However, the white-stone fence with metal guardrails and gates has survived. Today it is located between buildings 5 and 7 in Dashkov Pereulok.

Merlin sold the estate to Andrei Dashkov. In the 1840s, his son Vasily Dashkov (1819-1896), the future Director of the Moscow Rumyantsev Museum in Pashkov House on Vagankovsky Hill (3/5 Vozdvizhenka Street, building 1), resided in the main building. It stored the richest collection of ancient manuscripts and books, chronicles and ancient diplomas collected by Count Nikolai Rumyantsev. His son-in-law, an artist and Vice-President of the Academy of Arts Prince Grigory Gagarin (1810-1893) also resided in Andrei Dashkov's house.

After Andrei Dashkov's death in 1865, the mansion had several owners, some of them rented it out. In Soviet times, the building had communal flats and housed the State Procurement Committee of the Kazakh SSR. Currently, the house is a theatrical venue with immersive performances staged. Their action takes place in the rooms of the old building. Unlike with classic productions, the audience of immersive performances is free to participate in them together with the actors.

"The house in Dashkov Pereulok has not only memorial, but architectural value as well. This is a typical example of Moscow residential development design of the early 19th century. Its simple decor is typical of classicism. There are tiled stoves and the old staircase survived in the mansion. The flooring of the first floor is made of metlach tiles," Head of the Moscow Cultural Heritage Department Alexei Yemelyanov said.

The building front is decorated with an avant-corps (a projection) with square semi-columns and straight moulded cornices. The roof has dormer windows.

According to Alexei, restoration of the main building of the urban estate in Dashkov Pereulok completed this February. Experts have restored the historical appearance of the building's facades and upgraded its interiors. They removed the wallpaper from the old stoves applied yet in the Soviet era and the linoleum from metlach tiles.

"Before the restoration, the building has already been listed as a discovered cultural heritage site, so all work was approved by the Moscow Cultural Heritage Department and supervised by our experts," added Alexei Yemelyanov.

There is an ongoing program in place to preserve and restore Moscow’s architectural landmarks. The cultural heritage list is regularly updated.  Over the past seven years alone, about 700 monuments have been added.  They include over 370 newly discovered cultural heritage sites and about 330 cultural heritage landmarks of federal and regional significance.

So, for example, a building with a pharmacy in Malaya Bronnaya Street has recently been recognised as an architectural landmark. This six-storey neoclassical building was erected in 1913. It had rented apartments, as well as shops and workshops downstairs. Over a century ago, there was a pharmacy on the first floor.  It is remarkable that the pharmacy has survived.

The register of cultural heritage sites of regional importance also includes Kalinovskaya's revenue house with its asymmetrical facade and firebirds over the windows. The five-storey building was erected in 1911 by architect Ernst-Richard Niernsee in late Art Nouveau style.

In addition, a two-storey building of the Culture Centre of National Research Centre ''Kurchatov Institute'' is recognised as an architectural monument. It is a piece of Soviet monumental classicism built in the late 1940s.