Benches, lampposts plus a new lawn: Geroyev-Chernobyltsev public garden takes on a new look

Benches, lampposts plus a new lawn: Geroyev-Chernobyltsev public garden takes on a new look
The city installed a monument to the clean-up workers of the Chernobyl disaster in the Geroyev-Chernobyltsev public garden. Today, a total of 362 families who survived the Chernobyl disaster live in the Novo-Peredelkino District. This includes the people who moved there from contaminated areas together with children of Chernobyl survivors.

The city has recently finished giving a face lift to the Geroyev-Chernobyltsev public garden in the Novo-Peredelkino District. This green spot is famous for its granite obelisk installed to commemorate the clean-up workers of the Chernobyl disaster of 1986. The sign on the memorial reads, “Glory to the heroes! They put an end to the nuclear disaster at the cost of their own lives. To Chernobyl survivors residing in the Novo-Peredelkino District.” In the centre of the monument, there is the depiction of the medal presented to the clean-up workers of the Chernobyl disaster.

The public garden, which measures 2,700 sq m, is located by 6 Sholokhova Street, 400 m away from the Novoperedelkino metro station, which opened in late August, 2018.

“This small public garden is a very important and significant landmark for the locals,” explained a representative from Moscow’s Department for Major Housing Repairs. “There are a total of 362 families who survived the Chernobyl disaster residing in the Novo-Peredelkino District. This includes families who moved there from the contaminated areas, plus children of Chernobyl survivors. In 1997, a decade after the Chernobyl disaster took place the city erected an obelisk in the garden. Ever since, there have been all kinds of commemorative events there. Recently, the locals asked the district council to improve the garden as they pointed out that the asphalt around the monument and the paths was cracked and most of kerbstones had been destroyed. The people in the area also suggested that something desperately needed to be done about the lawns as they were worse for wear. The to-do list also included proper lighting as well as play grounds.”

It only took about two months to improve the garden. Paths and the area around the monument were covered with gray Gotika paving stones, which are different from the traditional sort frequently made out of concrete. This kind of stones really do look just like natural stone. This effect is achieved by specially treating the surface of the stones and adding dyes and pebbles during the process of making them.

Workers completed the job by replacing the old kerbstones and putting down turf to create a 2,000 sq m lawn. The green spot which has taken on a rather different look is now also decked out with benches and rubbish bins. To ensure that walking through the garden to and from the Novoperedelkino metro station after dusk is safe, the city thought it wise to distribute 12 lampposts throughout the garden.

Electricians are currently trying out the new lights to make quite sure that they go on and off when required.

This year, the city had 82 green spots on its to-do list, including 24 city parks and nature zones, 25 new local parks and 33 landmarks, including boulevards, popular public gardens and squares. Improvement work in Park Pobedy in Zelenograd and the Lyublino Estate Park in the Southeastern Administrative Area will continue next year.

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