Tibetan icons, Christ and the Apostles: What else is worth seeing at The Roerichs. Preserving Culture exhibition

Tibetan icons, Christ and the Apostles: What else is worth seeing at The Roerichs. Preserving Culture exhibition
Svetoslav Roerich. Christ and the Apostles. 1934. Canvas, oil. State Museum of Oriental Art
More than 300 paintings by the Roerichs are on display.

A large-scale exhibition, The Roerichs. Preserving Culture, opened at VDNKh on 4 September, marking the foundation centenary of the State Museum of Oriental Art. It occupies pavilion 13 Healthcare (the former pavilion of the Armenian Soviet Socialist Republic).

Preserve culture is the key message sent by the Roerichs to future generations. Both Nicholas Roerich and his son Svetoslav turned to the Orient at the early stages of their career, which led them to northern India, to the Kullu Valley in the Himalayas. Most of their works were inspired by Kullu.

More than 300 paintings by the Roerichs are on display, which makes this exhibition absolutely unique. The exhibits include Oriental sculpture and Tibetan cloth icons, as well as archival documents from the Museum of Oriental Art and the Soviet Roerich Foundation.

The Roerichs: From father to son

Visitors will see the best works by Nicholas Roerich, including thematic paintings and landscapes, among them Slavic Land, Kidnappers of Fire, Sword of King Gesar and Pink Peaks and hundreds of sketches from his famous Himalayas series.  

Svetoslav Roerich is represented by his Indian period, mostly genre paintings, including Sacred Flute, Red Land, My Neighbours and Walking Alone. In addition to this, visitors will see his rarely exhibited famous canvas Christ and the Apostles.

Of special interest are Svetoslav Roerich’s portraits of his wife, well-known film star Devika Rani Roerich, Indian celebrities and saints.      

The exhibition showcases precious documents from the Roerich family archives, most of which cover Nicholas Roerich’s expedition to Central Asia in the mid-1920s and his trip to Lhasa, the capital of Tibet.

There are also rare Buddhist cloth icons, unique photographs as well as the diaries of Nicholas Roerich’s wife Helena.

The exhibition will be on until 15 October and is open daily, except Mondays: 11.30 am to 8 pm on Tuesdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays as well as from noon to 9 pm on Wednesdays and Thursdays.