Stucco moulding, pilasters and avant-corps: City to restore Prokhorov-Khludov Estate’s façades by late August

Stucco moulding, pilasters and avant-corps: City to restore Prokhorov-Khludov Estate’s façades by late August
A historical building in Podsosensky Pereulok is an outstanding example of eclectic architecture dating to the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

A historical building in Podsosensky Pereulok is an outstanding example of eclectic architecture dating to the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The city will restore the Prokhorov-Khludov Estate’s façades by late August. This two-storey mansion with a mezzanine and a basement was built in the late 18th century.

Official documents first mentioned this building in 1803. Historians believe that merchant Alexei Patepalov was the estate’s first owner. In 1870, Praskovya Khludova, the wife of honourable citizen of Moscow Konstantin Prokhorov, bought the estate from Patepalov’s heirs. For his part, Prokhorov was a member of the Prokhorov clan which owned the famous Tryokhgornaya Manufactory producing textiles.

Khludova had the mansion rebuilt and extended several times. The building’s façades were also renovated, surviving to this day. The main floor received a decorative wall pier, and an avant-corps was added to its central section. This avant-corps is decorated with a gable adorning the mansion. Three windows in the building’s central section are decorated with small cornices/pediments featuring stucco garlands. The courtyard wing was extended in 1901, and the second floor was added to it.

“The estate in Podsosensky Pereulok is an outstanding example of eclectic architecture dating to the late 19th and early 20th century. Its geometrically correct forms and clear proportions combine with the façades’ stucco work, pilasters that imitate columns and an avant-corps. The building is an architectural landmark protected by the state. Work is now underway to restore the Prokhorov-Khludov Estate’s façades. Specialists have cleaned and smoothed out the façades, and they have painted them in line with the building’s colour concept. Missing decorative elements, including cornices/pediments, attics, etc., have also been restored. Drip moulds and weathering slopes have been repaired and partially replaced. There are plans to repair and restore the roof, the white-stone pedestal and the porch. In conclusion, we want to cover the restored façade with a special protective solution that will shield it from precipitation, winds and fluctuating temperatures,” Head of the City Department of Cultural Heritage Alexei Yemelyanov said.

Artistic decorations and 3D architecture of the main building dating to the late 18th century and the courtyard extension, commissioned by Praskovya Khludova, survive to this day. Drive-through gates are located in the estate’s south and north sections. The estate’s courtyard accommodated a garden that was destroyed in the late 20th century and replaced with an administrative building. Some of the estate’s interiors also remain intact, including wall-and-ceiling stucco moulding, glued parquetry with a frieze (decorative border), lamp plafonds and much more. Tile stoves can be seen in the corners of some rooms. The estate was last restored in the 1990s and now houses bank offices.

The City Department of Cultural Heritage focuses on restoring architectural landmarks and preserving them. The main building of the Novikov-Davydov City Estate, built in 1821-1878, has recently been restored. This past spring, the city rebuilt the façade of the Moscow State Picture Gallery owned by People’s Artist of the USSR Alexander Shilov and located inside an 1829 brick mansion.

The 17th century Lay Brothers Building has been restored at the Monastery of the Holy Sign in central Moscow. Built in 1684-1689 by stonemasons Fyodor Grigoryev and Georgy Anisimov from Kostroma, this stone building with a wooden roof housed two-storey monk cells.