Stained glass, sheep and a star: Front of VDNKh’s Agriculture Pavilion restored back to its original look

Stained glass, sheep and a star: Front of VDNKh’s Agriculture Pavilion restored back to its original look
The front of the pavilion was restored alongside sculptures and tainted glass. Once renovated, the pavilion will become home to a museum of Russian writing.

The front of VDNKh’s Agriculture Pavilion No.58 (formerly known as Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic’s pavilion) has been restored, including its unique decorative elements and a coat of arms designed as a glass mosaic above the entrance. Pereyaslavskaya Rada stained glass artwork has been also restored to its original appearance, as well as the pavilion’s spire and the star above it, obelisks, ceramic capitals and the entrance arch.

“The front of the Agriculture Pavilion has a spectacular design with light beige glazed ceramic tiles decorated with patterns of plants, crops and animals that were the pride of the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic. In addition, portals are decorated with colourful ceramic elements showing various fruit and vegetables, including pears, apples, grapes and pumpkins,” Head of Moscow’s Department of Cultural Heritage Alexei Yemelyanov said.

The building is crowned with a blue decorative pattern across its perimeter and brown column capitals. The first storey is marked by a composition of sickles and hammers together with wheat sprouts. The pattern is made of ceramic blocks manufactured at the Kiev Experimental Ceramic Art Factory in 1954.

The building’s corners are decorated with sculptures of young women wearing wreaths covered with golden glass mosaic. The entrance near the Stone Flower fountain has two obelisks, as well as the sculptures Industrial Stakhanovites and Rural Stakhanovites.

The Commission of the Department of Cultural Heritage has concluded acceptance procedures regarding the restoration work that has been going on since 2017. Once the pavilion’s interiors are restored, it will become home to the museum of Russian writing.

Pavilion No. 58 was designed by architect Alexei Tatsy for the opening of the 1954 exhibition as the largest pavilion representing a Soviet republic. For the first ten years it was used to display Ukraine’s agricultural achievements, followed by an exhibition of farm crops.