250,000 people have used all-night buses and trams since June

250,000 people have used all-night buses and trams since June
Use of all-night buses and trams up by 20 percent this summer.

Around 250,000 people have used all-night buses and trams since June this year. The passenger numbers on all-night routes are up 20 percent since the start of the summer compared to the figures for the spring period.

“Muscovites are spending more time at parks and squares, and the night buses and trams offer a convenient way to get home after staying out late,” said Maxim Liksutov, Deputy Moscow Mayor and Head of the Department of Transport and Road Infrastructure Development. “The all-night routes are also in strong demand after big celebrations and public events,” he said.

Currently, 10 night routes operate in Moscow – nine bus routes and one tram route. All-night transit routes are a convenient and cheaper alternative to taking a taxi. They intersect at convenient locations and follow the main roads and metro lines. The routes make it possible to reach railway stations, airports, city parks, or simply to get from one end of the city to the other. All-night fares can be paid for with the usual public transit tickets, including multi-fare passes (Yediny), 90 Minute and TAT, and the Troika card. Those entitled to preferential rates on public transport enjoy the same benefits on the night routes.

All-night bus and tram service starts at 11pm and ends at 5am. There are also 24-hour-a-day routes. Buses on the B route run every 15 minutes, and every 30 minutes on the other routes.

Once the road development work taking place as part of the My Street programme ends this year, seven new night routes will start, departing from the redeveloped Slavyanskaya Ploshchad, which will become central Moscow’s new transport hub.