Eurasian lynx cubs born at the Moscow Zoo for the first time in 10 years

Eurasian lynx cubs born at the Moscow Zoo for the first time in 10 years
Three young lynxes can be seen in the cat row on the old zoo grounds.

Three young Eurasian lynxes have been born at the Moscow Zoo for the first time in 10 years. The cubs are only two weeks old and their eyes have just opened.

“The cubs stay with their mother all the time. She feeds them milk, keeps them warm and licks them,” the Moscow Zoo press service reports. “Zoologists do their best not to bother the feeding female with cubs, so the sex of the cubs is still unknown.”

Eurasian lynx cubs born at the Moscow Zoo for the first time in 10 years. Moscow Mayor’s official web site.

The press service pointed out that this is the northern cat couple’s first litter. They have been living at the zoo from an early age, and now they are already eight years old. The couple did not get along for a long time, so they were kept separate from each other. They were brought together again only two years ago. This time the lynxes liked each other and the long-awaited cubs were born as a result.

In four to six weeks, the cubs will grow stronger and start to try meat. By the age of three months, they will begin to show interest in the world around them, following their mother everywhere. By the age of nine months, they will acquire the usual greyish-red colour; so far they are light brown. They will turn into adult lynxes by the age of 18 months. At the same time, they will grow their trademark ear tufts.

The male lynx does not take part in looking after the cubs. Still, zoologists decided not to relocate him. At present, visitors can see the male watching the female rear their offspring. The lynx family lives in the cat row on the old zoo grounds. The best time to meet them is at about nightfall, in the twilight when lynxes are more active.

The zoo staff comes up with ways to entertain the animals all the time. For example, the female likes to play with a pumpkin. She enjoys biting the peel and turning it into small crumbs with her teeth. The male, on the contrary, prefers sound sleep to all games.

The Moscow Zoo has been experiencing a baby-boom lately. For example, the South America enclosure boasts a new-born capybara.

The African animals pavilion offers visitors an opportunity to meet a rare black buck foal, and a young alpaca, or a curly camel, is on view in the ungulates row. Two slow lorises were born at the zoo recently. They can be seen in the Nocturnal World room of the Primates pavilion.