Three new stations are up-and-running on the Kalininsko-Solntsevskaya Line

Three new stations are up-and-running on the Kalininsko-Solntsevskaya Line
Photo: Photo by the Mayor and Moscow Government Press Service. Yevgeny Samarin
Soon, the areas around the Minskaya, Lomonosovsky Prospekt and Ramenki metro stations will be given a facelift and adjacent roads repaved.

Sergei Sobyanin has unveiled the new, Delovoy Tsentr – Ramenki,  section of the Kalininsko-Solntsevskaya Line. On 16 March, trains on this section began running in both directions. Five metro stations and two transit hubs are now open to passenger traffic.

Minskaya, Lomonosovsky Prospekt and Ramenki are the three new metro stations that were built to extend the line. Other improvement projects for the line include opening the second entrance hall at Park Pobedy station and running the trains from the new stations through to Delovoy Tsentr from Park Pobedy.

In the spring and summer, the grounds around Minskaya, Lomonosovsky Prospekt and Ramenki metro stations will be given a facelift and adjacent roads repaved. 

“Today is a red-letter day,” Sobyanin said. “Moscow has launched the new 10-kilometre Delovoy Tsentr–Ramenki radial line with five metro stations to improve service to and from the Moskva City business centre, Park Pobedy (Victory Park) and Moscow State University, as well as hundreds of thousands of local residents.”   

According to Mr Sobyanin, the line will be extended further to Solntsevo and Novo-Peredelkino. “This year, we plan to start all the main projects that will add 15 kilometres to the line,” the mayor said. 

Sobyanin together with construction workers and members of the Moscow Government took a ride from Park Pobedy to Ramenki, stopping at Minskaya and Lomonosovsky Prospekt metro stations.  

At Lomonosovsky Prospekt metro station, Sobyanin awarded the builders who were involved in the project: they were awarded the title Honorary Construction Worker of Moscow and Honorary Transport and Communications Worker of Moscow and given letters of gratitude from the Mayor of Moscow.   

Solntsevsky radial section

The Solntsevsky radial section of the Kalininsko-Solntsevskaya Line will be built in phases:

— the first section between Delovoy Tsentr station and Park Pobedy station opened in early 2014 (3.4 kilometres, two metro stations). Until March, passengers could only use a shuttle service via one tunnel that connected the two stations. The construction of the second tunnel was completed in 2016;    

— the second section that connected Park Pobedy station and Ramenki station opened in December 2016 (7.3 kilometres, three metro stations);

— the third section, between Ramenki station and Rasskazovka station (including a train maintenance facility), is in the active construction phase and is making good progress (15.3 kilometres, seven metro stations).

There are plans to build a fourth section, extending the line from Delovoy Tsentr to Tretyakovskaya station (3.7 kilometres and three metro stations) to connect it to the Kalininsky radial section.

New Minskaya, Lomonosovsky Prospekt and Ramenki metro stations

The entrance to Minskaya station is on the street of the same name somewhere between the Memorial Mosque and the railway flyover. This is a shallow level station with one row of columns along the direct axis and an island platform 163 metres long and 10 metres wide. 

The station is designed in a high-tech style, with grey being the dominant colour. The walls are lined with cerametallic panels while vandal-resistant glass was used to protect the columns. The design includes sloping walls and ceilings to produce an asymmetrical effect. 

The metro station has one entrance hall with exits to both sides of Minskaya Street. The second entrance hall was built as an emergency exit and will open later.

Average daily passenger traffic at Minskaya metro station will reach an estimated 8,700 people a day. The number of metro riders may peak on Victory Day and other days when Poklonnaya Gora hosts public events. The station will be used by Matveyevskoye District residents for the most part. 

Lomonosovsky Prospekt metro station is located at Michurinsky Prospekt and Lomonosovsky Prospekt intersection. It is also a shallow level station that features one row of columns along the direct axis and an island platform 163 metres long and 12 metres wide.

The metro station is decorated with graphic elements in the shape of numerals, which symbolise the exact sciences to evoke an association with Lomonosov Moscow State University, which is located in the neighbourhood. 

The station features two entrance halls with exits via pedestrian underpasses to residential developments, public facilities and surface transit stops on Michurinsky Prospekt and Lomonosovsky Prospekt.  

Average daily passenger traffic at Lomonosovsky Prospekt metro station is expected to reach about 100,000 people, the majority of whom will be residents of Michurinsky Prospekt, Mosfilmovskaya and Minskaya streets and other streets adjacent to the metro station, as well as teachers, staff and students from Moscow State University, diplomats and visitors to foreign embassies located in the area and employees of, and visitors to other organisations. 

The opening of this metro station will partly ease passenger traffic at Universitet and Kievskaya metro stations.

Ramenki metro station is located on Michurinsky Prospekt at Vinnitskaya Street. This is also a shallow level double-aisle metro station with one row of columns and an island platform 163 metres long and 12 metres wide.

The station has two entrance halls with exits to residential developments, public facilities and surface transit stops located on both sides of Michurinsky Prospekt. Passengers can use escalators, or lifts in the case of low-mobility people, to get from the platform to the entrance halls. 

The interior design theme was prompted by the history of the district: tree silhouettes against a green background reminiscent of oak groves that once grew in the area.

On average, passenger traffic to and from the station is expected to be some 120,000 people a day. They will be mostly residents of blocks of flats lining Michurinsky Prospekt. In the future, the station is likely to be used by teachers, staff and students from the new departments of Moscow State University (MGU) to be created under the MGU Technological Valley project.

The Moscow Metro’s longest escalator

A new entrance hall with the Moscow Metro’s longest escalator will open at the city’s deepest-lying metro station (85 metres), which is Park Pobedy.

The escalator is 126.8 metres long rising 63.4 metres.

New service standard for passengers

The equipment installed at the new metro stations meets the new service standards that are designed to help metro riders feel more comfortable. The standards include the following services:

— passengers will be able to pay for tickets and top up their Troika cards by credit card at ticket offices or using ticket-vending machines;  

— passengers will be able to pay for single trips (or to pass through turnstiles) by PayPass- or PayWave-enabled credit card or by using NFC-enabled smartphones; 

— passengers will be able to charge their mobile devices on the metro; and

— metro station employees will be wearing a new uniform.

Metro for 600,000 Muscovites

The construction of the Kalininsko-Solntsevskaya Line will help achieve the following:

— improve public transport service for 600,000 Muscovites living in the Ramenki, Prospekt Vernadskogo, Ochakovo-Matveyevskoye, Troparyovo-Nikulino, Solntsevo and Novo-Peredelkino districts, as well as in the townships  of Moskovsky and Vnukovskoye, including about 300,000 who will now be within walking distance of a metro station;

— ease passenger traffic at the southeastern section of the Sokolnicheskaya Line and at the transit hubs outside of Yugo-Zapadnaya, Prospekt Vernadskogo and several other metro stations;

— ease road traffic on the Borovskoye and Kievskoye motorways, Prospekt Vernadskogo, Michurinsky Prospekt and Leninsky Prospekt and the section between Michurinsky Prospekt and Leninsky Prospekt on the Moscow Ring Road; and

— improve the environmental situation in the west of the city by reducing traffic volumes.

Fifty-five new metro and MCC stations

In all, 101 kilometres of new lines and 55 new stations have been built in Moscow from 2011 to 2016, including the following:

On the Lyublinsko-Dmitrovskaya Line:

— the Maryino–Zyablikovo section (three stations);

— the Maryina Roshcha–Petrovsko-Razumovskaya section (three stations);

— a second exit (entrance hall) at Maryina Roshcha station.

On the Kalininsko-Solntsevskaya Line:

— the Novogireyevo–Novokosino section (one station);

— the Delovoy Tsentr–Ramenki section (five stations).

On the Zamoskvoretskaya Line:

— the Krasnogvardeiskaya–Alma-Atinskaya section (one station);

— new Tekhnopark station.

On the Arbatsko-Pokrovskaya Line:

— the Mitino–Pyatnitskoye Shosse section (one station).

On the Tagansko-Krasnopresnenskaya Line:

— the Vykhino–Kotelniki section (three stations);

—Spartak station.

On the Butovskaya Line:

— the Ulitsa Starokachalovskaya–Bitsevsky Park section (two stations).

On the Sokolnicheskaya Line:

— the Yugo-Zapadnaya–Salaryevo section (three stations).

Also, 31 stations opened on the Moscow Central Circle and an additional entrance hall was built for a metro station.