Passengers to take avant-garde selfies and admire paintings by Malevich and Kandinsky at Park Kultury station

Passengers to take avant-garde selfies and admire paintings by Malevich and Kandinsky at Park Kultury station
Passengers will now be able to pose for a photo in front of 20th century paintings and to buy monthly tickets with images of peacocks.

Photo stand-ins with details of paintings by 20th century artists will be installed at the entrance to the Park Kultury metro station. Billboards with fascinating facts about 20th century art will overhang escalators, and portraits of Kazimir Malevich, Wassily Kandinsky and other artists will delight passengers between platform arches. The station will be decorated in line with the six-month Intensive 20 educational project, implemented jointly with the State Tretyakov Gallery from Wednesday, 30 November.

Steering towards Malevich

Photo stand-ins with details of paintings by 20th century artists will be installed at the entrance to the Park Kultury metro station. Passengers will be able to take selfies here and to post them online using free Wi Fi near the photo stands. Billboards with fascinating facts about the avant-garde, Soviet and contemporary art and details of paintings by famous artists will overhang escalators. Passengers will find out the meaning of the word avant-garde, gain an insight into the life and times of avant-garde artists, and enjoy  details of paintings “Self-portrait in Turban” by Mikhail Larionov and “Picturesque Architectonics: Black, Red and Grey” by Lyubov Popova.

Thematic markers, including “Heading towards Korzhev,” “Looking at Bulatov” and “Steering towards Malevich,” will be pasted on the station’s floor. They will guide riders towards the exit. Once outside, they will be able to reach the nearby building of the State Tretyakov Gallery, which runs exhibitions of Russia’s top avant-garde artists.

The portraits of Kazimir Malevich, Wassily Kandinsky, Lyubov Popova, Vyacheslav Koleichuk and other artists will delight the passengers in between platform arches. The artists’ quotes under the portraits will tell the public about their personalities and work.

Monthly tickets and avant-garde train

Thematic monthly tickets will be available to buy at the Park Kultury station. The tickets will display the image of a peacock from Natalia Goncharova’s avant-garde painting “A Peacock under a Bright Sun.”

On 30 November, an avant-garde train with 78 paintings by famous 20th century artists from the State Tretyakov Gallery’s collection at the Krymsky Val Street building will start operating on the metro’s Circle Line. All masterpieces are subdivided into three periods: the avant-garde, Soviet and contemporary art. The train will feature details of paintings by Kazimir Malevich, Wassily Kandinsky, Yury Pimenov, Erik Bulatov, Natalia Goncharova, Alexander Deineka and other artists. Passengers aboard the train will also learn about the history of 20th century Russian art.

The glowing 20th century

The aim of the Intensive 20 project is to present 20th century Russian art to the public in a wide variety of ways. This includes an intensive intro at metro stations, a course on the Intensiv20.ru project website, lectures on the project’s social networks and an in-depth course at the State Tretyakov Gallery’s building on Krymsky Val Street. The project is jointly organised by the Department of Transport, the Moscow Metro and the State Tretyakov Gallery.

A three-metre-tall Roman numeral XX to be installed at the entrance to Park Kultury station on the metro’s Circle Line, will be illuminated at night.

“The project’s logo is based on Erik Bulatov’s painting “Russian 20th Century.” The Roman numeral XX is combined with classic graphics on the doors of metro stations and trains. This symbolises the project’s link with the metro, as well as with the dynamic and fast-paced intensive course,” project organisers explained.

Erik Bulatov’s painting “Russian 20th Century”, seen as a symbol of the classic contemporary period, depicts an idyllic Russian landscape, with the 20th century looming ominously over it.

“It was fascinating to turn to the 20th century, a crucial period in the metro’s history, a century when most metro lines were designed and built in the city. The State Tretyakov Gallery’s building on Krymsky Val Street houses the largest national collection of 20th century Russian art,” Moscow Metro sources noted.